NHGRI funds development of third generation DNA sequencing technologies

from genome.gov

Bethesda, Md., Mon., Sept. 13, 2010 — More than $18 million in grants to spur the development of a third generation of DNA sequencing technologies was announced today by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The new technologies will sequence a person’s DNA quickly and cost-effectively so it routinely can be used by biomedical researchers and health care workers to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease.  (Read more … )

$1,000 Genome Grants

NHGRI’s Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies grants have as their goal the development of breakthrough technologies that will enable a human-sized genome to be sequenced for $1,000 or less. Grant recipients and their approximate funding are:

Adam Abate, Ph.D., GnuBIO Inc., New Haven, Conn.
$240,000 (1 year)
Microfluidic DNA Sequencing

Jeremy S. Edwards, Ph.D., University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque
$2.7 million (3 years)
Polony Sequencing and the $1000 Genome

Javier A. Farinas, Ph.D., Caerus Molecular Diagnostics Inc., Los Altos, Calif.
$500,000 (2 years)
Millikan Sequencing by Label-Free Detection of Nucleotide Incorporation

M. Reza Ghadiri, Ph.D., Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, Calif.
$5.1 million (4 years)
Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing with Engineered Nanopores

Steven J. Gordon, Ph.D., Intelligent Bio-Systems Inc., Waltham, Mass.
$2.6 million (2 years)
Ordered Arrays for Advanced Sequencing Systems

Xiaohua Huang, Ph.D., University of California San Diego
$800,000 (2 years)
Direct Real-Time Single Molecule DNA Sequencing

Stuart Lindsay, Ph.D., Arizona State University, Tempe
$860,000 (3 years)
Tunnel Junction for Reading All Four DNA Bases with High Discrimination

Amit Meller, Ph.D., Boston University
$4.1 million (4 years)
Single Molecule Sequencing by Nanopore-Induced Photon Emission

Murugappan Muthukumar, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst
$800,000 (3 years)
Modeling Macromolecular Transport for Sequencing Technologies

Dean Toste, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
$430,000 (2 years)
Base-Selective Heavy Atom Labels for Electron Microscopy-Based DNA Sequencing

To read the grant abstracts go to Advanced Sequencing Technology Awards 2010. For more details about the full technology development program, go to: Genome Technology Program.

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